Blog

It is Said that everyone has a story, but here these stories are unique. Ask yourself just how many times you hear of real-life stories of service from blind people. On our blog, you get to read such stories. From AmeriCorps members, to individuals and groups, you will read about blind people doing many types of service work in different settings using different skills to do seemingly visual tasks. These people aren’t amazing; they are just people who believe that as citizens in this country and people living in the world, they have a right and responsibility to give back to their community.

Throwing a Party for the Homeless Kids!

Editor’s Note: For this month’s theme, we asked people to talk about service projects their chapter has done. The following comes from Jonathan Franks of Texas, who serves on the board of the NFB of Texas Austin Chapter.

Doing it All Wrong and Burning the House Down

Editor's Note: Conchita Hernández grew up in California. She came to the profession of teaching through the embrace of her personal experiences as an immigrant, a woman, and a blind individual. As a civil rights advocate, she has taught and mentored migrant, inner city students and Spanish speaking families. She holds a Masters degree from Louisiana Tech’s innovative Teacher of Blind Students Graduate program. She has worked in Nebraska as a Vocational Rehabilitation counselor with blind children and adults. She is now living in Washington DC, where she co-teaches in an inclusive pre-k classroom.

My AmeriCorps Experience

Editor's Note: To celebrate the 20th Anniversary of AmeriCorps, the Community Service Division will be featuring blog entries written by AmeriCorps alums. The first one comes from Serena Cucco of New Jersey.

To Help and Give Back

Editor’s Note: For this month’s theme, we asked people to talk about service projects they were involved in as a youth and why they continue to serve. The following comes from Chris Parsons of Missouri.

Why Do I Serve

Editor’s Note: In honor of National Volunteer Month, begun by President Nixon in 1974, we in the Community Service Group asked people to tel us what led them to serve and why they continue to serve. The following comes from Darian Smith of California, the group’s founder and chairperson.

January’s Guest Speaker: Jermesa Lee

Editor’s Note: From time to time, we invite guest speakers to talk about their community service experience. Jermesa Lee of Florida was our guest speaker in January. Jermesa is the Vice-President of the Florida Association of Blind Students. She and a friend also co-founded the All Things Are Possible Program INC to mentor at-risk girls in the community. Here is her story.

The Twofold Power of Mentorship

Editor’s Note: The following spotlight appears on the Web site of the NFBJI National Center for Mentoring Excellence. It not only demonstrates the impact of a mentoring relationship on the mentoring pair, but it also shows blind people taking an active role in their community and participating in community service. We’ve reposted it here with permission.

January’s Guest Speaker: Chris Parsons

Editor’s Note: In December 2010, we began inviting guest speakers to talk about their community service experience during the first half of each monthly conference call. Chris Parsons of Missouri was our guest speaker in January. Chris has done a variety of community service work. Here is her story.

December’s Guest Speaker: Jen McEachen

Editor’s Note: In December 2010, we began inviting guest speakers to talk about their community service experience during the first half of each monthly conference call. Jen McEachen of Canada was our first guest speaker. Jen has done a variety of community service work over the years. Currently, she volunteers for the Canadian Red Cross. Here is Jen’s story.

Welcome to the Community Service Blog

How do you feel about community service? Do you volunteer your time once in a while in the community or with your local church and want to find other blind individuals to connect with? Do you find community service interesting, but are not sure that you as a blind person can get involved or don’t know how to begin?

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